Video CD (1993 – 2000s)

Video CD (Compact Disc Digital Video or VCD) was a derivative of the Compact Disc, used for playback of video. The standard was created in 1993 by Sony, Philips, Matsushita and JVC, and is referred to as the White Book standard.

Like audio Compact Disc, it uses 120 mm optical discs. Dedicated Video CD player were available, but most DVD and Blu-ray players, personal computers, and some video game consoles will play them.

The older CD Video format could only store analogue video and was limited in its capacity to just 5 minutes of video, but new digital compression techniques allowed 74 minutes of audio and video on a Video CD. Overall quality is similar to VHS.

Video CD had a brief period of success, and some major feature films were released on it (usually as a 2 disc set). However it lacked copy protection so the increasing availability of recordable media such as CD-R meant unauthorised copies could be made, and DVD (which had copy protection and regional coding) became available in 1998. During the 2000s, DVD replaced it.

Video CD made considerable inroads into Asia and developing nations, where it is still in use today.

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